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Articles

“I’d Rather be Teaching!” – Transforming Injustice into Action in a Graduate Labor Movement

How did a group of students who “would rather be teaching,” come to organize, sustain, and finally emerge as victors in a campus-wide movement? This photo-essay analyzes the role of emotions, injustice framing, and interaction rituals in a successful graduate student labor movement at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Re(art)iculating Refugees: Spectacle and the Cultural Contestation of Law

Stepnitz argues that the waning relevance of current refugee law creates a space in which the legal conception of the refugee can and must be challenged. Through the work of the Berlin-based Center for Political Beauty, she explores one way in which art offers an alternative vision in which refugees are rearticulated first and foremost as human and welcome.

Returning to Class? – Eribon and ‘Identity Politics’ in the Time of Trump

In the wake of the 2016 translation of sociologist Didier Eribon’s penetrating memoir, Returning to Reims into German, Ben Trott calls for a critical re-engagement with the intersections of sexuality, class, nation, and resistance.

Teaching in a Trump Country: The Political Potential of Introductory Sociology

Shelly Steward discusses the experience and challenges of teaching sociology at a community college in a conservative, rural area during the 2016 election cycle. She concludes that teaching introductory sociology can provide common tools for students to use that can bridge ideological divides, suggesting a need for quality sociology educators across educational institutions.

The New Politics of Resistance against White Supremacy and the Far Right – Call for Papers

The BJS is seeking contributions that critically reflect on leftist organizing against white supremacy and right-wing politics, such as Antifa, Black Lives Matter, BAMN, Redneck Revolt, etc. Submissions can engage with sociological subfields including, but not limited to, social movements, gender, race and ethnicity, politics, violence, and law.

Unsettling “Indian American Hindus” and Model Minority Projects in Trump-Era “America”

South Asians have found themselves lodged between competing stereotypes: the docile and disciplinable “achiever” and the ungovernable “terrorist.” Model minority myths inform “Indian American Hindus” of their proximity to “whiteness” while reinforcing a color line that is impossible and dangerous to cross.