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Teaching in a Trump Country: The Political Potential of Introductory Sociology

Shelly Steward discusses the experience and challenges of teaching sociology at a community college in a conservative, rural area during the 2016 election cycle. She concludes that teaching introductory sociology can provide common tools for students to use that can bridge ideological divides, suggesting a need for quality sociology educators across educational institutions.

The New Politics of Resistance against White Supremacy and the Far Right – Call for Papers

The BJS is seeking contributions that critically reflect on leftist organizing against white supremacy and right-wing politics, such as Antifa, Black Lives Matter, BAMN, Redneck Revolt, etc. Submissions can engage with sociological subfields including, but not limited to, social movements, gender, race and ethnicity, politics, violence, and law.

Unsettling “Indian American Hindus” and Model Minority Projects in Trump-Era “America”

South Asians have found themselves lodged between competing stereotypes: the docile and disciplinable “achiever” and the ungovernable “terrorist.” Model minority myths inform “Indian American Hindus” of their proximity to “whiteness” while reinforcing a color line that is impossible and dangerous to cross.

An International Perspective on Jonathan Smucker’s Hegemony How-To: A Roadmap for Radicals

Rebecca Tarlau reviews Jonathan Smucker’s Hegemony How-To, and argues that in addition to building stronger working-class, anti-racist, feminist, LGBTQ, anti-imperialist movements in the United States, the political alignment we build should be international, connecting with the many other working-class groups that are fighting against the same oppressive political and economic system.

The Sunflower Movement and the Taiwanese National Identity: Building an Anti-Sinoist Civic Nationalism

Anti-Sinoism in Taiwan has penetrated the state, crystallizing into an ethnic conflict that has escalated to include induced immigration, and pressured emigration. Contemporary constructions of what it means to be Taiwanese both echo anti-Sinoist themes from historical social movements, and ultimately infuse civic nationalism with anti-Sinoism.